SURGERY

Surgeries Performed at OVC

We offer the most advanced surgical techniques and technology. All patients are carefully screened for safety, and anesthetics are specifically tailored to your pet. Surgical services and facilities include: a fully trained veterinary and technical staff, to ensure the safest, most efficient, state-of-the-art procedures for your pet; heated surgery tables for greater comfort; advanced sterilization techniques; ECG and oxygen saturation monitors; and intensive after surgery care and full blood testing.

Radiology

One of the most common and valuable medical diagnostic tools is radiography or x-rays. X-rays are highly useful for screening areas of the body that have contrasting tissue densities or when evaluating solid tissues. Our hospital is equipped to perform routine radiology services to identify many types of illness or injury when pets are sick or suffer a trauma.

X-rays can be used to detect a variety of ailments including arthritis, tumors, and lung abnormalities including pneumonia, bladder, and kidney stones. They are also used to evaluate bone damage, organ integrity and identify foreign objects that may have been ingested. Dental radiographs will help to distinguish between healthy teeth and those that may need to be extracted, and identify any abnormalities beneath the gums including root damage, tumors, and abscesses.

Radiology – or X-rays – helps our veterinarians evaluate muscular-skeletal, cardiovascular (cardiopulmonary), gastrointestinal, reproductive and urinary systems.

Our new digital radiograph machine is now installed and working. This will allow us to take digital dental x-rays and our body radiographs are also digitalized. Ask us for a copy of your radiographs. We can copy the radiographs to a CD and give you a copy to view on your home computer. Sending the radiographs to a veterinary radiologist also became easier and quicker.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound utilizes high frequency sound waves to generate pictures of what is going on inside the body. Ultrasound examination can be used to evaluate the size, shape, location, internal structure, and function of hidden internal organs. These non-invasive painless exams can detect the abnormal presence of fluid and the differences in organ tissue density for both the chest and abdominal areas. Ultrasound can also be utilized for evaluating the status of a pregnancy and as an emergency diagnostic tool to detect internal bleeding.

Mon, Wed, Fri.: 8am–5:30pm
Tuesday & Thursday: 8am–7pm
Saturday & Sunday: Closed

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Olympic Veterinary Clinic
1331 E Front Street
Port Angeles, WA 98362
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Contact Us

PHONE (360)452-8978
EMAIL mail@olympicvet.com
New Clients Welcome!

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What You Need to Know Before Your Pet’s Upcoming Surgery

Many people have questions about various aspects of their pet’s surgery, and we hope this information will help. It also explains the decisions you will need to make before your pet’s upcoming surgery.

Is the anesthetic safe?

Today’s modern anesthetic monitors have made surgery much safer than in the past. At our hospital, we do a thorough physical exam on your pet before administering anesthetics, to ensure that a fever or other illness will not be a problem.

Pre-anesthetic blood testing is important in reducing the risk of anesthesia. Blood testing before surgery is recommended to ensure that the liver and kidneys can handle the anesthetic. Even apparently, healthy animals can have serious organ system problems that cannot be detected without blood testing. If there is a problem, it is much better to find it before it causes anesthetic or surgical complications. We administer IV fluids to patients during most of our anesthetic procedures. This is a critical part to keep patients well hydrated throughout the procedure and provides us with an emergency access port if the need should arise.

If serious problems are detected, surgery can be postponed until the problem is corrected. For geriatric or ill pets, additional blood tests, electrocardiograms, or x-rays may be required before surgery as well. It is important that surgery be done on an empty stomach to reduce the risk of vomiting during and after anesthesia. You will need to withhold food for at least 8 to 12 hours before surgery.

Will my pet be in pain?

Anything that causes pain in people can be expected to cause pain in animals. Pets may not show the same symptoms of pain as people do; they usually do not whine or cry, but you can be sure they feel it. Particular pain medications will depend on the surgery performed. We include pain management with every surgical procedure for both the comfort of the patient, and to speed the recovery process. This may involve a postoperative injection, which will ensure the patient is comfortable upon walking as well as a restful night’s sleep at home.

When deemed necessary by the doctor, medication for the next few days is also included. Major procedures require more pain relief than things like minor lacerations. For dogs, we may recommend an oral anti-inflammatory the day after surgery and several days after to lessen the risk of discomfort and swelling. We use newer medications, which are less likely to cause stomach upset and can be given even the morning of surgery.

The cost of the medication will range depending on the size of your dog. Because cats do not tolerate standard pain medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or Tylenol, we are limited in what we can give them. Recent advances in pain medications have allowed for better pain control in cats than ever before. After surgery, pain medication is given on a case-by-case basis. Any animal that appears painful will receive additional pain medication.

Will my pet have stitches?

For some surgeries, we use absorbable sutures underneath the skin. These will dissolve on their own and do not need to be removed later. Some surgeries, especially tumor removals, do require skin stitches. With either type of suture, you will need to keep an eye on the incision for swelling or discharge. Most dogs and cats do not lick excessively or chew at the incision, but this is an occasional problem you will also need to watch for. If there are skin sutures, these will usually be removed 10 to 14 days after surgery. You will also need to limit your pet’s activity level for a time and no baths are allowed for the first 10 days after surgery.

What other decisions do I need to make?

While your pet is under anesthesia, it is the ideal time to perform other minor procedures, such as dentistry, ear cleaning, or implanting an identification microchip. If you would like an estimate for these extra services we are happy to provide them at your request.

Every pet's first exam is free! Call us today at (360)452-8978

HOURS

Mon, Wed, Fri:  8am–5:30pm
Tues & Thurs: 8am–7pm
Saturday & Sunday: Closed

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Mon, Wed, Fri: 8am–5:30pm
Tues & Thurs: 8am–7pm
Sat. & Sun: Closed

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  • Many people have questions about various aspects of their pet’s surgery, and we hope this information will help. It also explains the decisions you will need to make before your pet’s upcoming surgery.

    Is the anesthetic safe?

    Today’s modern anesthetic monitors have made surgery much safer than in the past. At our hospital, we do a thorough physical exam on your pet before administering anesthetics, to ensure that a fever or other illness will not be a problem.

    Pre-anesthetic blood testing is important in reducing the risk of anesthesia. Blood testing before surgery is recommended to ensure that the liver and kidneys can handle the anesthetic. Even apparently, healthy animals can have serious organ system problems that cannot be detected without blood testing. If there is a problem, it is much better to find it before it causes anesthetic or surgical complications. We administer IV fluids to patients during most of our anesthetic procedures. This is a critical part to keep patients well hydrated throughout the procedure and provides us with an emergency access port if the need should arise.

    If serious problems are detected, surgery can be postponed until the problem is corrected. For geriatric or ill pets, additional blood tests, electrocardiograms, or x-rays may be required before surgery as well. It is important that surgery be done on an empty stomach to reduce the risk of vomiting during and after anesthesia. You will need to withhold food for at least 8 to 12 hours before surgery.

    Will my pet be in pain?

    Anything that causes pain in people can be expected to cause pain in animals. Pets may not show the same symptoms of pain as people do; they usually do not whine or cry, but you can be sure they feel it. Particular pain medications will depend on the surgery performed. We include pain management with every surgical procedure for both the comfort of the patient, and to speed the recovery process. This may involve a postoperative injection, which will ensure the patient is comfortable upon walking as well as a restful night’s sleep at home.

    When deemed necessary by the doctor, medication for the next few days is also included. Major procedures require more pain relief than things like minor lacerations. For dogs, we may recommend an oral anti-inflammatory the day after surgery and several days after to lessen the risk of discomfort and swelling. We use newer medications, which are less likely to cause stomach upset and can be given even the morning of surgery.

    The cost of the medication will range depending on the size of your dog. Because cats do not tolerate standard pain medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or Tylenol, we are limited in what we can give them. Recent advances in pain medications have allowed for better pain control in cats than ever before. After surgery, pain medication is given on a case-by-case basis. Any animal that appears painful will receive additional pain medication.

    Will my pet have stitches?

    For some surgeries, we use absorbable sutures underneath the skin. These will dissolve on their own and do not need to be removed later. Some surgeries, especially tumor removals, do require skin stitches. With either type of suture, you will need to keep an eye on the incision for swelling or discharge. Most dogs and cats do not lick excessively or chew at the incision, but this is an occasional problem you will also need to watch for. If there are skin sutures, these will usually be removed 10 to 14 days after surgery. You will also need to limit your pet’s activity level for a time and no baths are allowed for the first 10 days after surgery.

    What other decisions do I need to make?

    While your pet is under anesthesia, it is the ideal time to perform other minor procedures, such as dentistry, ear cleaning, or implanting an identification microchip. If you would like an estimate for these extra services we are happy to provide them at your request.

Every pet's first exam is free! Call us today at
(360)452-8978

HOURS

Sign-up for email

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Every pet's first exam is free!
Call us today at
(360)452-8978

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